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Industrial Engineering Technology: Evaluate

The Industrial Engineering Technology curriculum prepares graduates to perform as technical leaders in manufacturing and service organizations. The study and application of methods and techniques for developing & implementing integrated systems.

Evaluating Information

Evaluating Information Found on the Web

Although these questions are designed for articles on the Web, they are equally valid for books, journals, radio or Television

Are the facts (information) presented accurately?

Are they documented?

Do they appear well-researched?

Are the facts (information) current for your topic?

Who is the audience?

Is the information biased?

Who are the author(s) or authority?

What are their credentials?

What is their educational background?

Have they published?

What is their experience in the field?

Are they cited by others?

What is their institutional affiliation?

What is the criteria for including the information?

What is the scope (coverage) of the site?

What does it include as well as what does it exclude?

If links are provided in the site, how are they evaluated for inclusion?

How does the information compare with other sources available for inclusion?

Both in print and electronic form?

Is the information/site stable?

Will you be able to access the information again and again?

When was the information updated?

What information was updated?

Evaluation Description

All that Glitters is not Gold

How credible is that site? Check it out before you cite.

"I will lie to you. Don't believe anything you hear on The Neal Boortz Show, unless it is consistent with what you already know to be true, or unless you have taken the time to research the matter to prove its accuracy to your satisfaction."

Neal Boortz, Radio Talk show host. [Excellent recommendation for anything you see or hear on radio, television, newspapers, journals, books, etc]

Tree Octopus

Check out this website:

Save The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus!

The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus

Would you cite this as a legitimate source for your paper? It may look like the information is accurate, but is it? Is it a clever (or malicious) hoax? Check it for accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency, and coverage. Does it still hold up? Would you cite it in your paper? Would you give this charity money? (I wouldn't. Octopuses don't have any pockets!)


Remember, even though this is a funny (and harmless) website, false information abounds on the internet. Check your sources!