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Bullying/Cyberbulling: Welcome

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What is Cyberbullying?

Logo for the National Crime Prevention CouncilCyberbullying is similar to other types of bullying, except it takes place online and through text messages sent to cell phones. Cyberbullies can be classmates, online acquaintances, and even anonymous users, but most often they do know their victims.

National Crime Prevention Council-  The National Crime Prevention Council’s mission is to be the nation’s leader in helping people keep themselves, their families, and their communities safe from crime. 

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What is Bullying?

Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Both kids who are bullied and who bully others may have serious, lasting problems.

In order to be considered bullying, the behavior must be aggressive and include:

  • An Imbalance of Power: Kids who bully use their power—such as physical strength, access to embarrassing information, or popularity—to control or harm others. Power imbalances can change over time and in different situations, even if they involve the same people.
  • Repetition: Bullying behaviors happen more than once or have the potential to happen more than once.

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Strategies/Techniques for Handling Hot Topics

hot topicsConducting academic research on hot topics can be tricky.

Make sure you:

  • choose your sources carefully (avoid misinformation) and understand the author's intentions and/or bias.
  • stick to the facts and logic in your own argument or discussion
  • recognize the emotional aspect of dealing with controversial topics

For more information, visit the Media Literacy Research Guide.

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